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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
the man behind the republican pledge not to raise taxes at all, not to raise tax rates, grover norquist. here's here. we'll get reaction from him as well in our roundtable. but first, i sat down with secretary geithner at the treasury department late friday. mr. secretary, welcome back to "meet the press." thank you for having us at the treasury department. >> good to see you. >> you are the president's lead negotiator. you have been to capitol hill. you presented the president's offer. and it immediately was not received well. it was called by republican leaders unserious. they have accused the president and you are wasting precious time here to avert the fiscal cliff. was this the intended effect of the president's first offer? >> what we're trying to do is to make it more likely. we come together on a good agreement for the american people that extends tax cuts to the american people. brings our long-term deficits down. tough spending savings is part of that, and invest in things that matter to the american economy, like infrastructure, and getting americans back to work. we think we
about grover norquist. by the way, karen, happy belated birthday. >> thank you. >> i hear you celebrated, i heard there was a wild party in d.c. last night. thanks for the invite. >> quick note here, don't know what you're doing with your sunday, but the president is off golfing and take a listen. take a look at the lineup. the partners on the course, u.s. trade representative, former mayor of dallas, ambassador ron kirk. democratic heavyweight, pro tension gubernatorial candidate. terry mcauliffe. and none other than william jefferson clinton playing. imagine the conversation out there on the links at andrews. >>> up next, we'll talk to the former senate majority leader who recently served as u.s. special envoy for middle east peace. was the leading peace negotiator for that region, former senator george mitchell will join us live on the other side of the break. we'll spend some time with him. >>> and record rainfall up and down the west coast. a live report from one northern california town, where the river is literally rushing through it. >>> money was the single most important factor
the election in 1992, and which we're still living, because that gave us grover norquist, et cetera. >> let's get to grover norquist in a minute, but i do have a question. the gop plan consists of $2.2 trillion in savings over a decade. that includes raging the eligibility age for medicare from 65 to 67. and lowering cost of living increases for social security benefits. they also propose overhauling the tax code to generate $800 billion in new revenue. but without raising taxes on the wealthy. in a letter to the president, leading republicans compared their plan to one erskine bowles drew up last year. >> not even close. >> he rejected that connection and the white house, of course, is hitting the road. we'll get to that in a moment. but here's my question. i've been watching the coverage of this and reading it. and there's a lot of liberals who were like, he won, ha, ha, they're so arrogant about it, it's hard to like them. because it's just not attractive. but he did -- >> yeah, he won. >> and he is going to the american people with this. and why can't the starting point of these negotia
. the politics has to be traverse. they've got to get through the rocky shoals of grover norquist. >> does that make it easier to keep politics out of it? >> i think it helps for the two men to make a deal that might work for all sides. i sound like i'm a broken record for myself but i'm still trying to find out if both parties are trying to find a win-win deal, something that they can both sell as a win or if one or both is simply trying to get everything they want and let the other guy -- >> but can the other side do that? it would seem if the momentum is with the president, he would be the one more likely to dig in and say, i'm going to take a clear win. >> true. and it's possible that the president, given how the election went and given the fact that a couple of years ago he had to give what the republicans wanted on the taxes issue might say, look, i've had enough. i'm not doing that anymore. however, if there's going to be a deal that's going avert the cliff, the speaker can cannot sell just anything. he's going to have to get entitlement reform or significant spending cuts that are
've got to get through the rocky shoals of grover norquist. >> right. >> and all those folks. >> and you have to get through the rocky shoals of nancy pelosi when you start talking entitlements. >> you see democrats who are, i think, talking very realistically about what needs to be done. on entitlements, i think the question isn't whether we have to do something about medicare, it's how we do something about medicare. >> so wouldn't that be -- and maybe it's naive of me to even bring this up -- but wouldn't that be important for them to take on what those are together and shoulder to shoulder? >> what i remember last summer when the president said to boehner essentially, let's lock arms and jump off the, you know, at that point it was a different kind of cliff, together. it's going to require both leaders. each is going to have to make sacrifices. in order to get this done. and i think that, you know, i think everybody recognizes the consequences of not getting it done. >> so how do you tell republicans that won't support a tax increase unless they believe entitlement reform's coming? h
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)